Madie

Sweet Madie!

My beautiful neighbor is officially a high school junior & going to prom! AH! Only yesterday she was 13!!

She’s always been a wonderful girl — and she’s turning into a remarkable, intelligent & beautiful woman!

I ❤ her so much!

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Sam R

Here are a few shots from a recent 15-20 minute Senior Photo shoot.

I met up with Sam & his mom at Wingra park just before sunset. We hit the ground running … er. photographing … and got some great shots. As his mom says, this photo shoot was “painless”. 🙂

It doesn’t take a lot of time to look good now, does it? That’s a great smile Sam!

David & Angie are expecting!

I am truly blessed.

Here I am thinking that I’d really love to start adding maternity & newborn photo shoots to my repertoire … and bam! Both of my brothers & their wives get pregnant within 6 months of each other! Woo Hoo. Not only am I soon to be the proud aunt of TWO nephews; but I have generous siblings who let me follow them around with my camera. And SUPER amazing sister-in-laws, who let me touch their bellies constantly … and you know, get half undressed for belly shots.

If you think I’m feeling lucky, you should see my mom2 … she has lost her mind with glee.

Miss Emi – at night with light

Take 2!

Last week Emily (Emi) and I explored the great outdoors. We had a great time capturing well over 100 seriously amazing portraits.

However we knew – we were going to have to go downtown. Not “downtown” where the lights are bright – but downtown where it’s dark, and moody and industrial.

We had one goal in mind – to get one perfect shot – painting with light. It only took us about 30 minutes to get all the elements together.

First was the hard part, waiting for the darkness. So, we played around a bit; on the parking structure, and near some abandoned (?) metal buildings, dancing around with glow sticks to kill some time.

Second was me, I had to paint with light behind her, quickly, in cursive and backwards. Um! Not easy. I am the worst cursive writer.

Third was mom, her job was to aim the flash (to make Emi look great) in the right direction, and to pop the flash at the exact right time.

Fourth was Emi, she had to sit relatively still, and look gorgeous. {She’s pretty good at that .. so she had the easiest job ;)} We are a great team, I think it only took us about 8 shots to get all the elements together …

and hey, why not add show you a few more 😉

Emily

Ah! When Emily wrote me asking for senior photos, she made a point of telling me that she wanted something fun. She brought along the balloons and bubbles, I brought the blankets and the bug spray.

We had a blast. Literally! We totally popped one of those fabulous red balloons in less than ten minutes. Thank goodness we got some great shots with them first! Luckily, bubbles were meant for breaking. I wouldn’t be surprised if we went through the whole bottle.

Emily told me she wasn’t concerned about “looking perfect” for the camera. I’m sad to disappoint her; I think she looks stunning in every-single-one. Am I right mom?

Fisheye Fun

I took advantage of this perfect Madison day to go explore a new nature area!

I was scouting out a location for a Senior Photo Shoot next week, and I needed a good excuse to play with my new iPhone fisheye lens. Best part about my new lens: totally affordable. Technology is awesome!

The Pheasant Branch Conservatory in Middleton is a beautiful place, with so many areas to explore.

I’m super excited for our photo shoot this week!!!

Pheasant Branch Conservatory

Mini Session with Caitlin

A mini-session with the cutie Miss Caitlin Ruby. An aspiring opera singer whose future I have no worries about. She’s beautiful and oh-so-cute in her never-ending collection of fabulous dresses.

If you’re interested in your own mini-session, contact me: info@maiaphotostudio.com

Ask a photog – Travel tips for photogs.

It’s summer time; let the cheering & chair-dancing begin!

Whether you plan to camp in your backyard, hit the road, or the skies – a vacation (I hope) is in your future! Photography and travel – well they are inseparable. As a well-traveled photographer, I can tell you that it comes down to a lot more than then just “taking pictures” when you get on the road.

Here are 10 tips to consider before you get out there!

Travel Tips for Photogs

1. Plan, plan, plan!

Where are you going, for how long, and what will happen while you’re there? Check local guides for any festivals, national events or really cool scenic spots before you get there. It never hurts to buy a map early. The more you know the better you can prepare.

2. Don’t forget your equipment.

It sounds obvious but it’s surprisingly easy to leave your camera charger at home – been there, done that. You’ll need batteries, memory cards, your charger (plus any world plug-converters if necessary) and your camera! Not to mention any cords or accessories you find useful. If you are traveling out of the country, or out to the country, these things can be hard to find or very pricey.

3. Tripod?

Think about this long and hard. Tripods are bulky and space consuming and usually mean you plan to spend a lot of your time taking photos. If you are flying anywhere or plan on doing a lot of walking on your vacation, you probably want to leave it at home. If you’re traveling by car and want to take leisurely landscapes and family photos then go for it! If you really want one with you, a table top tripod may be all you need. And here’s one for a point-and-shoot.

4. Carry your stuff with you.

Never put your camera equipment under the plane. No explanation needed I’m sure. Get a good camera bag that can hold your equipment comfortably and safely. They even make camera bags that don’t look like camera bags, for extra safety! The security detectors won’t bother your equipment. If you are bringing high-speed or professional film with you, then you probably know all about it and aren’t reading this :).

5. Carry your stuff with you!!!!

Get a strap for your camera and make sure when you hold your camera you have that strap in your hand or on your shoulder (across your body is great). If your camera is in a bag, but you are holding the bag strap … your camera can disappear and you might not notice. A reassuring bag strap doesn’t mean much when the bag is empty. Staying in a hotel? If you don’t need your camera when you go out, put your equipment in a room or hotel safe.

6. Memory cards, smaller may be better.

I recommend taking several low gigabyte/megabyte memory cards with you &, if you can, uploading them to your computer as often as possible. As a professional photog, I would never, ever shoot an entire wedding on one memory card. What if it was defective or damaged – or “knock on wood” I lost it. Instead I keep at hand several memory cards and switch them out throughout the day. It stinks, but you’ll feel much better if you only lose your trip to the Louvre – vs. – your entire European vacation. It happens, or rather, s*it happens – I hope not to you of course!

7. Remember the Golden Hour.

Early mornings and evenings when the light is shiny and “golden” are the best times for good photographs. Mid-day when the light is bright and everyone in your photos has their hand-shade up over their eyes – not so great.  Remember the light: you’ll have better photos and your family will think you’re a pro! If it looks good – it is!

8. Make sure you aren’t breaking the rules.

Museums, galleries and historical sites may have photography restrictions. If the sign says “no photos” they mean it! Don’t risk getting kicked out or having to delete your photos; it’s embarrassing. Also, learn how to turn off your flash before you go. Many places do not allow flash photography and no matter how hard you try your flash isn’t discreet. {You can always cover your flash with electrical tape if it really won’t shut off.}

9. Taking pictures of strangers

{This could be it’s own blog!} If you have a good zoom, you can always shoot from afar.  Or, buck up and just ask someone if you can take their photo! Always approach someone with your smile, not your camera. Smiles are the same in every language. Just smile, show your camera (keep it low, like you’re not shooting) point at it and say “photo?” If they decline, smile say “thanks” and walk away. Most people I’ve encountered have been wonderful and I wouldn’t trade those experiences for anything– the memory is better than the photo in most cases (and I’m pretty good at the photo part.)

10. Know your equipment.

If you just got your camera; or, if you haven’t used it in a while; or, if you use it all the time but really don’t know what you are doing  – figure it out before you go. I can tell you from personal experience that you won’t have a revelation on the road. The camera you can’t get to work at home won’t magically start taking better photos on vacation! Read that pesky manual. Or, better yet, get some hands-on experience in your backyard.

(11.) Take some time without your camera!

Don’t forget to put the camera down and take part in your fun! Photos don’t make memories; you do!

Have fun! *heidi